Trigger warning: weight.
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I used to try desperately hard to stay in the ‘single figures’ when it came to my weight. Desperately. That was my measure for success. And the days when the scales would tip over slightly to show double figures? I felt like a failure. I felt disgusting, beat myself up, couldn’t bear to look at myself in a mirror, sometimes couldn’t even get out of bed… All because my weight fluctuated minimally. The single figures, this arbitrary measurement, meant EVERYTHING to me.
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I’m not proud to admit any of that, but it was my truth and I know that this mentality applies to a lot of you, too. Because we’re taught that numbers are INCREDIBLY important when it comes to the scales or our clothes or our body measurements. We’re taught that if we see a number not deemed ‘good’, we should think of ourselves as a failure.
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It’s not true and I wish I could reach out to every single one of you that feels that way and tell you that – give you a big hug, let you know that it gets better and that it’s possible to change our mindset.
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This picture represents something that was so eye-opening for me when I first saw it. Because it illustrates how arbitrary the number on the scale is.
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Also – comparing your weight to someone else’s? Futile. Unfair. We are built completely differently – and there are many factors that determine what number ends up showing on the scale: shape, height, bone structure, muscle to fat ratio, ethnicity… It’s complex, and categorically NOT just to do with how much we eat, or how much we work out.
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Check out all of these ladies – all slim, yes, and none visibly fat, but all roughly the same weight and all completely different. Perfect proof that numbers do not mean anywhere near as much as we’re led to believe.
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Tag a person who wants to start Keto and could use this!⁣⁣⁣
Follow 🌸 @fatloss_meticore for keto recipes and tips⁣⁣⁣⁣!
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credit: unknown (DM for credit)

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